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1 A young man is walking down the street, quite casually, with an empty mind and no set purpose; he comes to a crossing, and for no reason that he could tell he takes the right hand turn instead of the left; and so it happens that he encounters a blue-eyed girl, who sets his heart to beating. He meets the girl, marries her–and she became your mother. But now, suppose the young man had taken the left hand turn instead of the right, and had never met the blue-eyed girl; where would you be now, and what would have become of those qualities of mind which you consider of importance to the world, and those grave affairs of business to which your time is devoted? 2 Something like that it was which befell Peter Gudge. Peter was walking down the street one afternoon, when a woman approached and held out to him a printed leaflet. “Read this, please,” she said. And Peter, who was hungry, and at odds with the world, answered gruffly: “I got no money.” He thought it was an advertising dodger, and he said: “I can’t buy nothin’.” 3 “It isn’t anything for sale,” answered the woman. “It’s a message.” 4 “Religion?” said Peter. “I just got kicked out of a church.” 5 “No, not a church,” said the woman. “It’s something different; put it in your pocket.” 6 “Read it some time when you’ve nothing else to do.” And so Peter, just to get rid of her, took the leaflet and thrust it into his pocket, and went on, and in a minute or two had forgotten all about it. 7 Peter was thinking that this was a heck of a life. Who could have foreseen that just because he had stolen one miserable fried doughnut, he would lose his easy job and his chance of rising in the world? Peter’s whole being was concentrated on the effort to rise in the world; to get success, which means money, which means ease and pleasure. 8 But who could have foreseen that Mrs. Smithers would have kept count of those fried doughnuts every time anybody passed thru her pantry? And it was only that one ridiculous circumstance which had brought Peter to his present misery. But for that he might have had his lunch of bread and dried herring and weak tea in the home of the shoe-maker’s wife, and might have still been busy with his job of stirring up dissension in the First Apostolic Church. 9 Always it had been like that, thru Peter’s twenty years of life. Time after time he would get his feeble clutch fixed upon the ladder of prosperity, and then something would happen–some wretched thing like the stealing of a fried doughnut–to pry him loose and tumble him down again into the pit of misery. 10 So Peter walked along, with his belt drawn tight, and his restless blue eyes wandering here and there, looking for a place to get a meal. There were jobs to be had, but they were hard jobs, and Peter wanted an easy one. There are people in this world who live by their muscles, and others who live by their wits; Peter belonged to the latter class; and had missed many a meal rather than descend in the social scale. 11 Peter looked into the faces of everyone he passed, searching for a possible opening. Some returned his glance, but never for more than a second, for they saw an insignificant looking man, undersized, undernourished, and with one shoulder higher than the other, a weak chin and mouth, crooked teeth, and a brown moustache too feeble to hold itself up at the corners. Peters’ straw hat had many straws missing, his second-hand brown suit was become third-hand, and his shoes were turning over at the sides. In a city where everybody was “hustling,” everybody, as they phrased it, “on the make,” why should anyone take a second glance at Peter Gudge? Why should anyone care about the restless soul hidden inside him, or dream that Peter was, in his own obscure way, a sort of genius? No one did care; no one did dream. 12 It was about two o’clock of an afternoon in July, and the sun beat down upon the streets of American City. There were crowds upon the streets, and Peter noticed that everywhere were flags and bunting. Once or twice he heard the strains of distant music, and wondered what was “up.” Peter had not been reading the newspapers; all his attention bad been taken up by the quarrels of the Smithers faction and the Lunk faction in the First Apostolic Church, otherwise known as the Holy Rollers, and great events that had been happening in the world outside were of no concern to him. Peter knew vaguely that on the other side of the world half a dozen mighty nations were locked together in a grip of death; the whole earth was shaken with their struggles, and Peter had felt a bit of the trembling now and then. But Peter did not know that his own country had anything to do with this European quarrel, and did not know that certain great interests thru out the country had set themselves to rouse the public to action.

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Which sentences in the passage are punctuated correctly? Here are some more questions I would like to ask Representative Weaver, If the driving age is raised to 21, what will happen to all the afternoon jobs, the afternoon sports, and the afternoon programs that require some sort of transportation? What will happen to America’s economy (and its spirit) when high schoolers can no longer work the fast-food jobs and restaurant hostess positions? “A teenager behind the wheel is the symbol of American youth,” writes author Peter Chacha: What will happen to this symbol if Representative Weaver’s plan is approved? Weaver also claims that “a majority of seat belt violations” are the fault of the under-21 crowd. But let me ask you this: Do people under the age of 21 really wear their seat belts less often than older people, or are they just caught more often? That is, we know the police have their eye on the teenagers, but are they looking at the adults as well? But I can hear it now: “If teenagers are all so safe, why do they have such high accident rates?” Here’s a possible answer. inexperience. Like anybody who is inexperienced, the teenage driver must suffer through a legitimate period of self-doubt and skills acquisition. Chances are, if the driving age were moved to 21, we would see 21- to 24-year-olds causing the largest percentage of safety problems—not because of a maturity problem, mind you, but just because they would be inexperienced at driving.

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You must read this short story to understand the question: It all began with Effie’s getting something in her eye. It hurt very much indeed, and it felt something like a red-hot spark—only it seemed to have legs as well, and wings like a fly. Effie rubbed and cried—not real crying, but the kind your eye does all by itself without your being miserable inside your mind—and then she went to her father to have the thing in her eye taken out. Effie’s father was a doctor, so of course he knew how to take things out of eyes. When he had gotten the thing out, he said: “This is very curious.” Effie had often got things in her eye before, and her father had always seemed to think it was natural—rather tiresome and naughty perhaps, but still natural. He had never before thought it curious. Effie stood holding her handkerchief to her eye, and said: “I don’t believe it’s out.” People always say this when they have had something in their eyes. “Oh, yes—it’s out,” said the doctor. “Here it is, on the brush. This is very interesting.” Effie had never heard her father say that about anything that she had any share in. She said: “What?” The doctor carried the brush very carefully across the room, and held the point of it under his microscope—then he twisted the brass screws of the microscope, and looked through the top with one eye. “Dear me,” he said. “Dear, dear me! Four well-developed limbs; a long caudal appendage; five toes, unequal in lengths, almost like one of the Lacertidae, yet there are traces of wings.” The creature under his eye wriggled a little in the castor oil, and he went on: “Yes; a bat-like wing. A new specimen, undoubtedly. Effie, run round to the professor and ask him to be kind enough to step in for a few minutes.” “You might give me sixpence, Daddy,” said Effie, “because I did bring you the new specimen. I took great care of it inside my eye, and my eye does hurt.” The doctor was so pleased with the new specimen that he gave Effie a shilling, and presently the professor stepped round. He stayed to lunch, and he and the doctor quarreled very happily all the afternoon about the name and the family of the thing that had come out of Effie’s eye. But at teatime another thing happened. Effie’s brother Harry fished something out of his tea, which he thought at first was an earwig. He was just getting ready to drop it on the floor, and end its life in the usual way, when it shook itself in the spoon—spread two wet wings, and flopped onto the tablecloth. There it sat, stroking itself with its feet and stretching its wings, and Harry said: “Why, it’s a tiny newt!” The professor leaned forward before the doctor could say a word. “I’ll give you half a crown for it, Harry, my lad,” he said, speaking very fast; and then he picked it up carefully on his handkerchief. “It is a new specimen,” he said, “and finer than yours, Doctor.” It was a tiny lizard, about half an inch long—with scales and wings. So now the doctor and the professor each had a specimen, and they were both very pleased. But before long these specimens began to seem less valuable. For the next morning, when the knife-boy was cleaning the doctor’s boots, he suddenly dropped the brushes and the boot and the blacking, and screamed out that he was burnt. And from inside the boot came crawling a lizard as big as a kitten, with large, shiny wings. “Why,” said Effie, “I know what it is. It is a dragon like the one St. George killed.” And Effie was right. That afternoon Towser was bitten in the garden by a dragon about the size of a rabbit, which he had tried to chase, and the next morning all the papers were full of the wonderful “winged lizards” that were appearing all over the country. The papers would not call them dragons, because, of course, no one believes in dragons nowadays—and at any rate the papers were not going to be so silly as to believe in fairy stories. At first there were only a few, but in a week or two the country was simply running alive with dragons of all sizes, and in the air you could sometimes see them as thick as a swarm of bees. They all looked alike except as to size. They were green with scales, and they had four legs and a long tail and great wings like bats’ wings, only the wings were a pale, half-transparent yellow, like the gear-boxes on bicycles. Question: How would you summarize the events in the story so far? Be sure to use details from the text to support your answer. Please Help!

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ANYONE WHO HAS READ HAMLET!! HELP!!! PLEASE ASAP!! 1) Upon seeing the full title of the play (The Tragical History of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark) what can we infer about Hamlet? A. He is a real, historical figure. B. His father has been murdered. C. He will die at the end of the play. D. He will be the King of Denmark at the end of the play. 2) What was Shakespeare’s motivation for writing Hamlet? A.The plague had caused the closing of the theaters and he wanted to gain back lost money upon their reopening. B. He thought that Hamlet’s story needed to be told so that his good name could be cleared in history. C. Queen Elizabeth was aging with no heirs and England was questioning who would succeed to the throne, and succession is the main idea in Hamlet. D. Shakespeare’s twins had just been born. Since he named the boy Hamnet, he wanted to pen a play in his son’s honor. 3) Hamlet’s hammartia or tragic flaw could include all of the following EXCEPT A. an inability to make up his mind B. uncertainty from not knowing the truth C. a melancholy love sickness which leads to temporary insanity D. having his reason submerged by excessive and powerful passions 4) What is a soliloquy? A. Comparing things without using “like” or “as” B. A series of related events that make up a story C. The first half of a play D. A speech was given by a character alone on the stage that reveals thoughts 5) Character foils are..? A. characters who have opposite traits. B. characters who are related through the family. C. characters who kill one another. D. characters who fall in love. 6) Which of the following is the BEST example of a thematic statement for the play Hamlet? A. Hamlet may have begun pretending to be mad, but the lines between sanity and madness began to blur as the play developed. B. Playing roles is confusing. C. “Brevity is the soul of wit” D. Unnatural deeds can be the source of all conflict. 7) Who is a character foil for Hamlet? A. Polonius B. Horatio C. Laertes Ophelia 8) How is Claudius related to Hamlet before marrying Gertrude? A. He is Hamlet’s legitimate father. B. He is the brother of Hamlet’s father, and therefore Hamlet’s uncle. C. He is a close family friend, and of no relation, though kindly called “uncle” D. He is the brother of Gertrude, and therefore Hamlet’s uncle. 9) In her encounters with her brother and her father, Ophelia comes across as A. rebellious, headstrong, and stubborn B. flighty, insincere, and silly C. courageous, brave, and noble D. sweet, innocent, and submissive 10) The ghost asks Hamlet to avenge his death by killing Gertrude and Claudius. A. True B. False 11) Hamlet pretends to be insane in order to…? A. enlist Ophelia’s sympathy B. prompt Claudius to send him away C. test his friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern D. conceal his attempts to get information regarding Claudius’s guilt 12) What reason does Polonius give for Hamlet’s madness? A. He loves Ophelia. B. He is upset about the marriage of Claudius and Gertrude. C. He is distraught over his father’s death. D. He is a moody teenager. 13) Who does Claudius ask to keep an eye on Hamlet? A. Ophelia B. Horatio C. Marcellus D. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern 14) Why is Hamlet so upset with himself in the “O, what a rogue and peasant slave,” soliloquy in Act II, scene ii, lines 559-617? A. He was never given the opportunity to achieve his dreams of becoming an actor. B. He can’t put thoughts and words into action while a group of actors can. C. The love between his father and mother is gone. D. He is tormented by the question of whether or not to kill himself. 15) Claudius killed King Hamlet by pouring poison in his ear. A. True B. False 16) Hamlet does not kill Claudius while Claudius is praying because A. Hamlet is afraid Claudius has a weapon B. Hamlet changes his mind C. Hamlet does not want Claudius to go to heaven D. The ghost tells him not to do so 17) The characteristic of Polonius that most directly led to his death is A. his nosiness and meddling B. his poor judgement C. his insincerity or shallowness D. his cruelty to Ophelia 18) Gertrude is surprised to see the ghost when he appears in her chambers. A. True B. False 19: Laertes and Hamlet are alike in that A. both are quick to act B. both have feigned madness C. both seek revenge for their father’s deaths D. both have escaped captivity to return to Denmark 20) Who tells Claudius and Laertes about the circumstances surrounding Ophelia’s death? A. Horatio B. Queen Gertrude C. Marcellus D. a messenger 21) Hamlet knew Yorick personally. A. True B. False 22) How do Claudius and Laertes plan to kill Hamlet? A. Laertes will stab him in a duel B. Claudius will give him a drink with poison C. Laertes will poison the tip of his sword and stab Hamlet D. All of the above

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1) Upon seeing the full title of the play (The Tragical History of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark) what can we infer about Hamlet? A. He is a real, historical figure. B. His father has been murdered. C. He will die at the end of the play. D. He will be the King of Denmark at the end of the play. 2) What was Shakespeare’s motivation for writing Hamlet? A.The plague had caused the closing of the theaters and he wanted to gain back lost money upon their reopening. B. He thought that Hamlet’s story needed to be told so that his good name could be cleared in history. C. Queen Elizabeth was aging with no heirs and England was questioning who would succeed to the throne, and succession is the main idea in Hamlet. D. Shakespeare’s twins had just been born. Since he named the boy Hamnet, he wanted to pen a play in his son’s honor. 3) Hamlet’s hammartia or tragic flaw could include all of the following EXCEPT A. an inability to make up his mind B. uncertainty from not knowing the truth C. a melancholy love sickness which leads to temporary insanity D. having his reason submerged by excessive and powerful passions 4) What is a soliloquy? A. Comparing things without using “like” or “as” B. A series of related events that make up a story C. The first half of a play D. A speech was given by a character alone on the stage that reveals thoughts 5) Character foils are..? A. characters who have opposite traits. B. characters who are related through the family. C. characters who kill one another. D. characters who fall in love. 6) Which of the following is the BEST example of a thematic statement for the play Hamlet? A. Hamlet may have begun pretending to be mad, but the lines between sanity and madness began to blur as the play developed. B. Playing roles is confusing. C. “Brevity is the soul of wit” D. Unnatural deeds can be the source of all conflict. 7) Who is a character foil for Hamlet? A. Polonius B. Horatio C. Laertes Ophelia 8) How is Claudius related to Hamlet before marrying Gertrude? A. He is Hamlet’s legitimate father. B. He is the brother of Hamlet’s father, and therefore Hamlet’s uncle. C. He is a close family friend, and of no relation, though kindly called “uncle” D. He is the brother of Gertrude, and therefore Hamlet’s uncle. 9) In her encounters with her brother and her father, Ophelia comes across as A. rebellious, headstrong, and stubborn B. flighty, insincere, and silly C. courageous, brave, and noble D. sweet, innocent, and submissive 10) The ghost asks Hamlet to avenge his death by killing Gertrude and Claudius. A. True B. False 11) Hamlet pretends to be insane in order to…? A. enlist Ophelia’s sympathy B. prompt Claudius to send him away C. test his friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern D. conceal his attempts to get information regarding Claudius’s guilt 12) What reason does Polonius give for Hamlet’s madness? A. He loves Ophelia. B. He is upset about the marriage of Claudius and Gertrude. C. He is distraught over his father’s death. D. He is a moody teenager. 13) Who does Claudius ask to keep an eye on Hamlet? A. Ophelia B. Horatio C. Marcellus D. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern 14) Why is Hamlet so upset with himself in the “O, what a rogue and peasant slave,” soliloquy in Act II, scene ii, lines 559-617? A. He was never given the opportunity to achieve his dreams of becoming an actor. B. He can’t put thoughts and words into action while a group of actors can. C. The love between his father and mother is gone. D. He is tormented by the question of whether or not to kill himself. 15) Claudius killed King Hamlet by pouring poison in his ear. A. True B. False 16) Hamlet does not kill Claudius while Claudius is praying because A. Hamlet is afraid Claudius has a weapon B. Hamlet changes his mind C. Hamlet does not want Claudius to go to heaven D. The ghost tells him not to do so 17) The characteristic of Polonius that most directly led to his death is A. his nosiness and meddling B. his poor judgement C. his insincerity or shallowness D. his cruelty to Ophelia 18) Gertrude is surprised to see the ghost when he appears in her chambers. A. True B. False 19: Laertes and Hamlet are alike in that A. both are quick to act B. both have feigned madness C. both seek revenge for their father’s deaths D. both have escaped captivity to return to Denmark 20) Who tells Claudius and Laertes about the circumstances surrounding Ophelia’s death? A. Horatio B. Queen Gertrude C. Marcellus D. a messenger 21) Hamlet knew Yorick personally. A. True B. False 22) How do Claudius and Laertes plan to kill Hamlet? A. Laertes will stab him in a duel B. Claudius will give him a drink with poison C. Laertes will poison the tip of his sword and stab Hamlet D. All of the above

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