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Help this is poetry stuff I am pretty good at poetry but this stumped me could really use some help The Lamb Little lamb, who made thee? Does thou know who made thee, Gave thee life, and bid thee feed By the stream and o’er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, woolly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice? Little lamb, who made thee? Does thou know who made thee? Little lamb, I’ll tell thee; Little lamb, I’ll tell thee: He is called by thy name, For He calls Himself a Lamb. He is meek, and He is mild, He became a little child. I a child, and thou a lamb, We are called by His name. Little lamb, God bless thee! Little lamb, God bless thee! The Tyger Tiger, tiger, burning brigh In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? And what shoulder and what art Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And, when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand and what dread feet? What the hammer? what the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? what dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp? When the stars threw down their spears, And watered heaven with their tears, Did He smile His work to see? Did He who made the lamb make thee? Tiger, tiger, burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Dare frame thy fearful symmetry. Based on tone, why is it fitting that “The Tyger” is featured in a volume titled, Songs of Experience?

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.Stephen Crane Born to Methodist parents in New Jersey in 1871, Stephen Crane was the last of 14 children. He began writing at the age of four. After the death of his father, he was left to care for his mother, who was deeply religious. Crane developed an aversion to religion. He dropped out of school and went to work for his brother Townley, who was a journalist. Later he moved in with his brother Edmund near a poor neighborhood. His experience of life in the slums influenced his ideas about realism and naturalism later on. On New Year’s Eve 1896, he boarded a steamship for Cuba, where he was planning to report on the Cuban rebellion against Spain. The ship sank, and Crane, along with three other men, had to escape in a lifeboat. The boat overturned, and one of the men died. This experience greatly influenced Crane’s belief that humankind existed in an uncaring universe, and he later explored this idea in his short story “The Open Boat.” The Open Boat The voyagers scanned the shore. A conference was held in the boat. “Well,” said the captain, “if no help is coming, we might better try a run through the surf right away. If we stay out here much longer we will be too weak to do anything for ourselves at all.” The others silently acquiesced in this reasoning. The boat was headed for the beach. The correspondent wondered if none ever ascended the tall wind-tower, and if then they never looked seaward. This tower was a giant, standing with its back to the plight of the ants. Based on the contextual information provided about author Stephen Crane, what theme does the last sentence of this excerpt from his short story “The Open Boat” likely reflect? Nature is cruel to the unfortunate. Only the strongest survive. Only the smartest survive. Only the lucky survive. Nature is indifferent to humans.

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Help! If any one of you read these stories, and ansewered these questions, I’m really stuck and IDK what to do. In the two parts of this assignment, you will demonstrate what you have learned about the elements of fiction and the techniques authors use to create suspense and communicate meaning. Part 1: Which story did you read? Describe the physical setting of the story. Which words or descriptions contribute to the emotional setting or mood? What is the mood that results from the author’s use of description? What is the theme? How do the final lines of the story influence the meaning or theme of the story? What techniques does the author use to create suspense throughout the story? Do you think the techniques you identified in question four were effective? Did they create suspense for you? In your opinion, what technique could be used more effectively? What techniques does the author use to create a surprise ending? Were you surprised by the twist? If so, why? If not, what should the author have done to make the ending more surprising and effective? What was your experience in reading this story? Did it evoke fear or physically have an effect on you? Why or why not? Part 2: Create your own story with a twist ending. Write a synopsis of the story up to the ending, and then fully develop the ending. Use at least three techniques that create suspense and a twist ending. Identify the techniques by labeling them. Create an alternate twist ending of the story that you read in the lesson. Summarize any changes that you would need to make to the rest of the story for your ending to make sense, and then fully develop your alternate ending. Use at least three techniques that create suspense and a twist ending. Identify the techniques by labeling them. Oops, I forgot to name the 3 stories: “The Boarded Window” by Ambrose Bierce, 1891 Old man Murlock boards up the only window in his house. Does he do this to keep something out or to keep something in? “Beware of the Dog” by Roald Dahl, 1946 A British fighter pilot crashes; this is the tale of his recovery. “The Sniper” by Liam O’Flaherty, 1923 A shootout between the two sides of the Irish Civil War unfolds one dark night.

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“I Sit and Look Out” Walt Whitman I Sit and look out upon all the sorrows of the world, and upon all oppression and shame; I hear secret convulsive sobs from young men, at anguish with themselves, remorseful after deeds done; I see, in low life, the mother misused by her children, dying, neglected, gaunt, desperate; I see the wife misused by her husband—I see the treacherous seducer of young women; I mark the ranklings of jealousy and unrequited love, attempted to be hid—I see these sights on the earth; I see the workings of battle, pestilence, tyranny—I see martyrs and prisoners; I observe a famine at sea—I observe the sailors casting lots who shall be kill’d, to preserve the lives of the rest; I observe the slights and degradations cast by arrogant persons upon laborers, the poor, and upon negroes, and the like; All these—All the meanness and agony without end, I sitting, look out upon, See, hear, and am silent. “First they came for…” Martin Niemöller First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out-— Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me. Use the excerpts above to write an essay, at least two paragraphs, supporting the question below. Remember to clearly state your main point and use quotes from the text to support your response, using the proper MLA format. How do Niemöller’s words in “First they came for…” repeat the theme developed in “I Sit and Look Out” by Walt Whitman?

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