Read this stanza from “The Raven.”

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,

“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;

But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,

And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,

That I scarce was sure I heard you”–here I opened wide the door–Darkness there and nothing more.

Question: How does Edgar Allan Poe create suspense in this stanza?

Options:

  • A) The darkness in the hallway foreshadows the dark bird’s entrance in the room.
  • B) The pacing is slowed down as the action of opening the door is delayed.
  • C) The source of the noise is not yet revealed, as no one is standing at the door.
  • D) The speaker believes that he has a visitor to his room, which turns out to be true.

Answer: The correct answer is option: C) The source of the noise is not yet revealed, as no one is standing at the door.

Explanation: Edgar Allan Poe narrates a very suspenseful moment where the nervous main character walks up to the chamber door, slowly turns the knob, and finds nothing. The room seems to have a creepy atmosphere, especially after the tapping at his chamber door.