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Read Abraham Lincoln’s Letter to fellow Republican James T. Hale. In this letter, President Lincoln suggests a compromise with the South’s demands to keep the Union from falling apart. Confidential. Hon. J. T. Hale Springfield, Ill. Jan’y. 11th 1861. My dear Sir—Yours of the 6th is received. I answer it only because I fear you would misconstrue my silence. What is our present condition? We have just carried an election on principles fairly stated to the people. Now we are told in advance, the government shall be broken up, unless we surrender to those we have beaten, before we take the offices. In this they are either attempting to play upon us, or they are in dead earnest. Either way, if we surrender, it is the end of us, and of the government. They will repeat the experiment upon us ad libitum. A year will not pass, till we shall have to take Cuba as a condition upon which they will stay in the Union. They now have the Constitution, under which we have lived over seventy years, and acts of Congress of their own framing, with no prospect of their being changed; and they can never have a more shallow pretext for breaking up the government, or extorting a compromise, than now. There is, in my judgment, but one compromise which would really settle the slavery question, and that would be a prohibition against acquiring any more territory. Yours very truly, A. LINCOLN. Which words best describe Abraham Lincoln’s tone in the letter? A.) nervous and insecure B.) bold but concerned C.) optimistic but timid D.) resigned and dejected

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1. Read the following sentences from “The Censors.” Only his darling mother worried, but she couldn’t get him back on the right road. She’d say, thought it wasn’t always true: Lola called, she’s at the bar with the girls, they miss you, they’re waiting for you. Or else she’d leave a bottle of red wine on the table. How does the writer mostly reveal the mother’s character? A. Through her actions B. Through her thoughts C. Through the narrator’s description of her D. Through her interactions with other characters 2. Read the following sentences from “The Youngest Doll.” The aunt thought he was listening for the breathing of the prawn to see if it was still alive, and she fondly lifted his hand and placed it on the spot where he could feel the constant movement of the creature’s antennae. The young man released the ruffle and looked fixedly at his father. “You could have cured his from the start,” he told him. “That’s true,” his father answered, “but I just wanted you to see the prawn that has been paying for your education these twenty years.” In these sentences, the prawn most likely symbolizes A. A craving for power and knowledge B. A sense of selfish motivation and greed C. A feeling of unity between father and son D. A secret shared between doctor and patient 3. Read the following sentences from “The Censors.” Only his darling mother worried, but she couldn’t get him back on the right road. She’d say, though it wasn’t always true: Lola called, she’s at the bar with the girls, they miss you, they’re waiting for you. Or else she’d leave a bottle of red wine on the table. How does the writer mostly reveal the mother’s character? (1 point) a. through her actions b. through her thoughts c. through the narrator’s description of her d. through her interactions with other characters

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MC) [June 25, 2013: Senate Hearing 113-70] [From the U.S. Government Printing Office] [Subcommittee on Energy of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources] STATEMENT OF ALEX LASKEY, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER OF OPOWER My name is Alex Laskey. I’m the President and Founder of OPower. We are the world’s leading provider of energy efficiency software for the utility industry. My friend, Dan Yates, and I started the company 6 years ago because we thought that Americans deserved better than a bill that was basically impossible to understand…Ordinary homeowners had a right to know, more about the energy they use and the energy they waste in their own homes… We’re based just here in Arlington, Virginia. We’re now 400 employees; two of us six years ago. We’re in seven countries with serving 91 utilities in 30 States including Minnesota and Idaho, not yet Vermont and seven countries. Today, we’ve helped save ordinary families more than $300 million on their electric bills…This year alone, in the next 12 months, we’ll generate another two Terrawatt hours in energy savings. Two Terrawatt hours, that’s more than enough energy to power every home in St. Paul and Cincinnati combined. It’s every home in Vermont uses less, in total, uses less than 2 Terrawatt hours a year. It’s roughly a third the size the State of Idaho. Put in another context, the solar industry last year in this country produced 4 Terrawatt hours of electricity. We’re producing two. The Hoover Dam produces just about two Terrawatt hours a year in energy savings, in energy. …57 percent of the energy in our economy is flat out wasted. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t tolerate having 57 percent of the coffee I pour into my coffee mug every morning fall out the other side of it….But we tolerate somehow 57 percent of the energy entering our economy being lost to things like heat, leakage, noise. This doesn’t even account for the energy that’s lost and wasted in homes when lights are left… on in unoccupied homes. We’ve estimated that 20 percent of the energy that’s consumed in homes is wasted on energy that does not contribute to lifestyle but does contribute to climate change. It’s $40 billion a year just on behavioral waste. So this is an urgent problem that we ought to do something about. We rank ninth of the twelfth industrialized countries in terms of energy productivity… We rank behind China. This is costing us $130 billion a year. That’s $1,000 a household. So the question is what can we do to eliminate waste and make our economy more productive? …Regulation hasn’t changed much since Thomas Edison. Rate utilities are still rewarded when their customers waste energy. They ought to be rewarded for helping their customers save it. Thomas Edison may not have envisioned a world in which we incentivize utilities to help customers use less power, but it’s common sense. Because helping people use less energy costs a lot less than building new power plants and transmission lines. Read this paragraph from the text: Today, we’ve helped save ordinary families more than $300 million on their electric bills…This year alone, in the next 12 months, we’ll generate another two Terrawatt hours in energy savings. Two Terrawatt hours, that’s more than enough energy to power every home in St. Paul and Cincinnati combined. It’s every home in Vermont uses less, in total, uses less than 2 Terrawatt hours a year. It’s roughly a third the size the State of Idaho. Put in another context, the solar industry last year in this country produced 4 Terrawatt hours of electricity. We’re producing two. The Hoover Dam produces just about two Terrawatt hours a year in energy savings, in energy. Which of these rhetorical devices is mainly used throughout this text? A)Ethos B) Logos C) Pathos D) Simile

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(MC)[June 25, 2013: Senate Hearing 113-70] [From the U.S. Government Printing Office] [Subcommittee on Energy of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources] STATEMENT OF ALEX LASKEY, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER OF OPOWER My name is Alex Laskey. I’m the President and Founder of OPower. We are the world’s leading provider of energy efficiency software for the utility industry. My friend, Dan Yates, and I started the company 6 years ago because we thought that Americans deserved better than a bill that was basically impossible to understand…Ordinary homeowners had a right to know, more about the energy they use and the energy they waste in their own homes… We’re based just here in Arlington, Virginia. We’re now 400 employees; two of us six years ago. We’re in seven countries with serving 91 utilities in 30 States including Minnesota and Idaho, not yet Vermont and seven countries. Today, we’ve helped save ordinary families more than $300 million on their electric bills…This year alone, in the next 12 months, we’ll generate another two Terrawatt hours in energy savings. Two Terrawatt hours, that’s more than enough energy to power every home in St. Paul and Cincinnati combined. It’s every home in Vermont uses less, in total, uses less than 2 Terrawatt hours a year. It’s roughly a third the size the State of Idaho. Put in another context, the solar industry last year in this country produced 4 Terrawatt hours of electricity. We’re producing two. The Hoover Dam produces just about two Terrawatt hours a year in energy savings, in energy …57 percent of the energy in our economy is flat out wasted. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t tolerate having 57 percent of the coffee I pour into my coffee mug every morning fall out the other side of it….But we tolerate somehow 57 percent of the energy entering our economy being lost to things like heat, leakage, noise. This doesn’t even account for the energy that’s lost and wasted in homes when lights are left… on in unoccupied homes. We’ve estimated that 20 percent of the energy that’s consumed in homes is wasted on energy that does not contribute to lifestyle but does contribute to climate change. It’s $40 billion a year just on behavioral waste. So this is an urgent problem that we ought to do something about. We rank ninth of the twelfth industrialized countries in terms of energy productivity… We rank behind China. This is costing us $130 billion a year. That’s $1,000 a household. So the question is what can we do to eliminate waste and make our economy more productive? …Regulation hasn’t changed much since Thomas Edison. Rate utilities are still rewarded when their customers waste energy. They ought to be rewarded for helping their customers save it. Thomas Edison may not have envisioned a world in which we incentivize utilities to help customers use less power, but it’s common sense. Because helping people use less energy costs a lot less than building new power plants and transmission lines. Read the last line of this text: Because helping people use less energy costs a lot less than building new power plants and transmission lines. The last line of this text emphasizes the author’s point of view because A) it states the author’s claim B) it challenges Thomas Edison’s vision for incorporated utilities C) it counters the author’s purpose laid out in the rest of the text D) it concludes the text

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