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Read the following passage and answer the question that follows. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Part 1 Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) Question 1: The passage implies that which of these is true about Mr. Utterson and Mr. Enfield? They only tolerated each other because of their family connection. They were united by their common interest in exploring new places. They had more fun with each other than with anyone else they knew. They enjoyed each other’s company despite differences in temperament. Question 2: Mr. Enfield is called “the well-known man about town.” What can we infer about his character, in contrast to that of Mr. Utterson? He is less wealthy than Mr. Utterson He is less important than Mr. Utterson He is not as socially awkward as Mr. Utterson He is not related to Mr. Utterson Question 3: What does the author suggest with the line “sometimes wondering, almost with envy”? Mr. Utterson sometimes seems to appear envious of those who don’t follow the rules. Mr. Utterson has learned to control his envy to the point where he never experiences it. Mr. Utterson wonders how he has met such a large number of envious people in his life. Mr. Utterson is aware that most people envy his inherited money and extravagant lifestyle.

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Somebody please help.. Read the following sentences from “The Black Sheep.” Meanwhile, the ones who had become rich got into the honest man’s habit of going to the bridge at night to watch the water flow by beneath it. This increased the confusion because it meant lots of others became rich and lots of others became poor. Now, the rich people saw that if they went to the bridge every night, they’d soon be poor. And they thought: “Let’s pay some of the poor to go and rob for us.” They made contracts, fixed salaries, percentages: they were still thieves of course, and they still tried to swindle each other. But, as tends to happen, the rich got richer and richer and the poor got poorer and poorer. 12. In these sentences, the narrator seems to suggest that the people admire the honest man’s hobbies. most people try to cheat others in some way. societal structures are built on values and hard work. society does not reward those who perform good deeds. Read the following sentence from “The Balek Scales.” Everything my grandfather took to the Baleks he entered on the back of a torn-off calendar page: every pound of mushrooms, every gram of thyme, and on the right-hand side, in his childish handwriting, he entered the amount he received for each item; he scrawled in every pfennig, from the age of seven to the age of twelve, and by the time he was twelve the year 1900 had arrived, and because the Baleks had been raised to the aristocracy by the Emperor, they gave every family in the village a quarter of a pound of real coffee, the Brazilian kind; there was also free beer and tobacco for the men, and at the chateau there was a great banquet; many carriages stood in the avenue of poplars leading from the entrance gates to the chateau. 13. In this sentence, the narrator recounts the grandfather’s note taking most likely to show the meticulous nature of the men in his village. demonstrate how intelligent his grandfather had been. provide a contrasting image of rich and poor in his society. illustrate the importance of accuracy when measuring income. Read the following sentences from “Forbidden Fruit.” It was perhaps to overtake him that my brother had wanted to become a car driver since the fourth grade. On every scrap of paper he would write the same text: To: Transport Office Chief Manager I hereby request that you employ me at your agency since I am a third-class driver. Later he realized his childhood dream, but it turned out that he had to exceed speed limits to overtake his temperament and finally had to change his trade. 14. Using information in these sentences, the reader can most likely conclude that the narrator’s brother cannot hold a steady job due to his fits of rage. lost his driver’s license due to speeding violations. is embarrassed about his lack of accomplishment. knows from an early age that he wants to race cars. Read the following lines from the story “Forbidden Fruit.” Of course, in childhood there were occasions when I could have tasted pork in kindergarten or ate at the home of a friend, but I never broke the commandment. When we had rice and pork in kindergarten, I fished out all the pieces of pork and gave them to my friends. I conquered the agony of yearning by the sweetness of self-denial. I enjoyed my ideological superiority. It was pleasant to be an enigma, to behave in a way baffling to everyone around. And yet, all the more intensely did I dream of transgression. 15. The type of conflict portrayed in these sentences can best be identified as man vs. man. man vs. nature. man vs. society. man vs. himself.

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There are, in the body politic, economic and social, many and grave evils, and there is urgent necessity for the sternest war upon them. There should be relentless exposure of and attack upon every evil man whether politician or business man, every evil practice, whether in politics, in business, or in social life. I hail as a benefactor every writer or speaker, every man who, on the platform, or in book, magazine, or newspaper, with merciless severity makes such attack, provided always that he in his turn remembers that the attack is of use only if it is absolutely truthful. . . To assail the great and admitted evils of our political and industrial life with such crude and sweeping generalizations as to include decent men in the general condemnation means the searing of the public conscience. There results a general attitude either of cynical belief in and indifference to public corruption or else of a distrustful inability to discriminate between the good and the bad. Either attitude is fraught with untold damage to the country as a whole. The fool who has not sense to discriminate between what is good and what is bad is well-nigh as dangerous as the man who does discriminate and yet chooses the bad. There is nothing more distressing to every good patriot, to every good American, than the hard, scoffing spirit which treats the allegation of dishonesty in a public man as a cause for laughter. Such laughter is worse than the crackling of thorns under a pot, for it denotes not merely the vacant mind, but the heart in which high emotions have been choked before they could grow to fruition. In this speech Roosevelt is advising journalists to write honestly and not always muckrake. In the final paragraph, how does Roosevelt attempt to persuade his audience? By appealing to the audience’s emotions By appealing to the audience’s sense of right and wrong By appealing to the audience’s good taste By appealing to the audience’s logic

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